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A Spring Update

strawberry blossoms
Strawberry blossoms

Just like there are plants blossoming in my garden right now (above), there are some equally exciting new developments figuratively in bloom here at World to Table that I thought I’d share with everyone.

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Black Cod Skin and Tails

The fish skin and tails are oftentimes the forgotten parts of the fish. Usually the first to get sliced off and tossed into the trash, they rarely make it past the chopping block and are scarcely ever seen on the dinner table.

I was excited to see that Chef Shirley Cheng, professor at the Culinary Institute of America, chose to use black cod skin and tails as her main ingredient for her winning recipe this past Saturday at the Japanese Ingredient Culinary Challenge at the Restaurant Show.


Shirley Cheng demoing her Black Cod Skin and Tails alongside emcees Ron Hsu and Jenna Zimmerman

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Inside Talisa’s Yellow Kitchen

As much as I love to take on a challenge and cook an exciting new recipe, it’s also a hassle to break my routine and invest in a new set of ingredients.  On top of that, I haven’t had much time to do much grocery shopping for myself, which is ironic since I work for a company that is all about grocery shopping.

Instead of looking for recipes, I’m looking to explore new ingredients and versatile ways to use them. I’ll be poking around other people’s kitchens and asking what they do with their staple ingredients.   Why am I doing this?  Hopefully to draw some culinary inspiration, change up my usual shopping list and ultimately, to expand my cooking repertoire.

This is the first of a series of Wunderkammer Interviews.  The concept behind the name Wunderkammer, or “cabinet of curiosities”, being that everyone has their own individual cabinet(s) of curiosities.  Just look in your kitchen.


My first victim, Talisa.

4. kitchen
And her kitchen in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

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Introducing World Platter

I’ve been working with World Foods to showcase their sauces and marinades, from exhibiting at food trade shows, cooking up big batches of curried soup to serve at a Yelp event, to making dishes for my apartment building’s potluck party.  But only those who happen to live in my building or attend these events have gotten a chance to taste.  Well, here’s your chance to give World Foods sauces a try, even if you aren’t lucky enough to be my neighbor.

Surprisingly still smiling after 2 days of intensive soup-making

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A Holiday Giveaway: Sugar, Spice and Everything Nice

Christmas is around the corner, flurries are aflutter and spiced apple cider is back on heavy rotation.  Yes, the holidays have arrived and here’s a gift giveaway to keep the mood fine and festive. As long as you live in the US, you are eligible to win these holidays treats.  Here’s to a little sugar and a little spice to make your holidays nice.

Chambre de Sucre
First, something sweet. This trifecta of gourmet sugars from Chambre de Sucre pairs well with coffee and tea, and is as easy on your eyes as they are on your tongue.  Whether you’re having high tea or just sipping a cuppa joe on Sunday morning, you can spruce it up with a spoonful of this sugar.  I hand-picked three of my favorites, but there are plenty more shapes, colors and varieties to choose from — go ahead, take a peekTo win these sweet treats, leave a comment with what hot beverage you’d pair your sugar with.

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Got Ramen Fever? Win 2 Tickets this Thursday

Hey there, Ramen-loving New Yorkers.  Here’s your lucky chance to win 2 FREE tickets to Ramen Fever at Asia Society this Thursday, December 16th from 6:30 – 9:30 pm.

The program will include a discussion with Shigeto Kamada, owner of Minca Ramen Factory and Kambi Ramen House, Jenny Miller, Assistant Food Editor at Grub Street/NYMag.com, Adina Steiman, Food Editor at Men’s Health magazine, and Rickmond Wong, owner of Ramen blog Rameniac, highlighting this exciting new trend. The talk will be followed by a Ramen demonstration and tasting given by Shigeto Kamada.

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Guess what I’m making for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving ingredients

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Reconsider the Cauliflower: Curried Cauliflower and Carrot Soup

It’s about time to give cauliflower another chance, some well deserved respect.  Think of cauliflower and the adjectives bland and mushy first come to mind.  When I look back to the days when I used to regularly eat Kid Cuisine frozen meals, my first impression of cauliflower was not a fond one. I associated it with the “mixed vegetables” compartment of the multi-compartmental tray — the compartment that I’d leave to eat last, if at all.

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Hot Pot Ambassador Dinner with Kian Lam Kho

hot pot spread

Big thanks to Kian for a beautiful meal, Jeff for organizing, and Talisa for this recap of the rooftop Hot Pot Ambassador Dinner.  Oh boy, I’m getting hungry again.
– Veronica

When Jeff’s email blast arrived in my inbox announcing the next Ambassador Dinner — an evening of traditional Asian hot pot dining with Kian Lam Kho — it took me about fifteen seconds to send in my RSVP.

I love hot pot. It’s something I grew up doing with my family at home (somewhat infrequently, but with zest — usually in conjunction with a slew of sweet and savory fondue nights, the better to make use of the cooking equipment needed for such endeavors).

The concept of Hot Pot is simple: a pot of hot broth sits in the center of the table on a burner which keeps the broth simmering. Everyone at the table partakes in adding a variety of uncooked items (like veggies, meat, seafood, dumplings, and noodles), and fishing them out as they’re ready to eat. Since most of the ingredients aren’t seasoned, additional flavor is added via the broth during cooking, as well as with dipping sauces after cooking. At the end, everyone slurps up the remaining broth, which has been infused with the flavors of everything that’s been cooked in it throughout the night.

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A Glimpse at Korean Temple Cuisine

IMG_1412

Two weeks ago, I was involved in producing an event to showcase Korean Temple Cuisine, a specialized cuisine originating from the culinary practices of Buddhist monks in Korea.  There were no barbecued meats to be found.  Instead, the tables were lined with plates of steamed lotus roots stuffed with multicolored rice, sprouts wrapped with paper thin sheets of pickled white radish and tied together with strands of chives, and rosy pink pickled vegetables sliced into precise uniform squares, just to name a few of the items in the spread of over 40 dishes.

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